9 of Kobe Bryant’s most inspirational quotes

3


9 of Kobe Bryant’s most inspirational quotes

  • Kobe Bryant died in a helicopter crash on January 26th, 2020. He was 41 years outdated.
  • Bryant was one of many all-time nice NBA gamers, identified for his dedication and work ethic.
  • He shall be remembered for his household values and charity work as a lot as his sporting prowess.
  • Learn 9 of Kobe Bryant’s most inspirational quotes beneath.

Kobe Bryant tragically died on Sunday in a helicopter crash about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. His 13-year-old daughter Gianna was additionally killed within the crash, together with eight different individuals.

Bryant shall be remembered as one of many NBA’s biggest gamers. Along with his work on the sporting subject, he was identified for his unbelievable dedication and charity work in service of others.

In honor of Bryant’s legacy, now we have curated 9 of his most inspirational quotes. The primary 5 are within the infographic beneath, with four extra quotes beneath the picture.

The philosophy of Kobe Bryant (infographic)

On failure

“When we are saying this cannot be accomplished, this cannot be done, then we are short-changing ourselves. My brain, it cannot process failure. It will not process failure. Because if I have to sit there and face myself and tell myself, ‘You’re a failure,’ I think that is a worse, that is almost worse than death.”

On not being afraid of failure

“I don’t mean to sound cavalier when I say that, but never. It’s basketball. I’ve practiced and practiced and played so many times. There’s nothing truly to be afraid of, when you think about it … Because I’ve failed before, and I woke up the next morning, and I’m OK. People say bad things about you in the paper on Monday, and then on Wednesday, you’re the greatest thing since sliced bread. I’ve seen that cycle, so why would I be nervous about it happening?”

On making sacrifices

“There’s a choice that we have to make as people, as individuals. If you want to be great at something there is a choice you have to make. We can all be masters at our craft, but you have to make a choice. What I mean by that is, there are inherent sacrifices that come along with that – family time, hanging out with your friends, being a great friend. being a great son, nephew, whatever the case may be. There are sacrifices that come along with that.”

On working onerous

“I never looked at [basketball] as work. I didn’t realize it was work until my first year in the NBA. When I came around, I was surrounded by other professionals and I thought basketball was going to be everything to them and it wasn’t. And I was like, ‘This is different.’ I thought everybody was so obsessive about the game like me. It was like, no? Oh, that’s hard work. I get it now.”

On management

“Leadership is lonely … I’m not going to be afraid of confrontation to get us to where we need to go. There’s a big misconception where people thinking winning or success comes from everybody putting their arms around each other and singing kumbaya and patting them on the back when they mess up, and that’s just not reality. If you are going to be a leader, you are not going to please everybody. You have to hold people accountable. Even if you have that moment of being uncomfortable.”

On chasing success

“When you make a choice and say, ‘Come hell or high water, I am going to be this,’ then you should not be surprised when you are that. It should not be something that is intoxicating or out of character because you have seen this moment for so long that … when that moment comes, of course it is here because it has been here the whole time, because it has been [in your mind] the whole time.”

On perseverance

“I’ve performed with IVs earlier than, throughout and after video games. I’ve performed with a damaged hand, a sprained ankle, a torn shoulder, a fractured tooth, a severed lip, and a knee the scale of a softball. I don’t miss 15 video games due to a toe harm that everyone is aware of wasn’t that severe within the first place.”

On mindset

“The last time I was intimidated was when I was 6 years old in karate class. I was an orange belt and the instructor ordered me to fight a black belt who was a couple years older and a lot bigger. I was scared s–less. I mean, I was terrified and he kicked my ass. But then I realized he didn’t kick my ass as bad as I thought he was going to and that there was nothing really to be afraid of. That was around the time I realized that intimidation didn’t really exist if you’re in the right frame of mind.”

On laziness

“I can’t relate to lazy people. We don’t speak the same language. I don’t understand you. I don’t want to understand you. I have nothing in common with lazy people who blame others for their lack of success. Great things come from hard work and perseverance. No excuses.”



Source

Facebook Comments

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More